It appears you have not yet registered with our community. To register please click here...

 
Go Back [M] > Madshrimps > WebNews
Inkjet can print eye cells Inkjet can print eye cells
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Inkjet can print eye cells
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 20th December 2013, 07:14   #1
[M] Reviewer
 
Stefan Mileschin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Romania
Posts: 136,109
Stefan Mileschin Freshly Registered
Default Inkjet can print eye cells

Neuroscientists at Cambridge University have come up with a more interesting use for their Inkjet printer other than printing photos of the lab's Christmas party.

According to the British journal Biofabrication, which we get for the spot the fabrication competition, the team used an inkjet printer to print cells from the eye, making a practical step in the quest to grow replenishment tissue for damaged or diseased organs.

Researchers at England's extracted two types of cells from rat retinas and squirted them through a printer nozzle to see if they survived.

Apparently the rats' retinas were healthy after being "printed," retaining their ability to survive and grow.

What the Cambridge boffins Keith Martin and Barbara Lorber believe is that they could use this technique to build artificial tissue in layers.

This is the first time that the technology has been used to successfully print mature cells from the central nervous system, the scientists said. They cautioned, however, that much work lay ahead.

What they want to do is build retinal tissue for people suffering from degenerative diseases of the eye as the loss of nerve cells in the retina is a feature of many blinding eye diseases.

"The retina is an exquisitely organised structure, where the precise arrangement of cells in relation to one another is critical for effective visual function," they said in a press release.

The team used a piezoelectric inkjet printer head, which expelled so-called glia cells and retinal ganglion cells from adult lab rats through a single nozzle less than one millimetre (0.04 of an inch) across.

Inkjet fluid has a narrow margin of error in terms of viscosity and surface tension before it stops working. Adding cells to the liquid had the potential to make a real mess.

The only thing wrong with the technique is that there was a large loss in the number of cells sinking to the bottom of the fluid reservoir where they could not be printed. The cells that were printed were undamaged and could grow.

http://news.techeye.net/science/inkj...rint-eye-cells
Stefan Mileschin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Scientists grow human liver from stem cells Stefan Mileschin WebNews 0 5th July 2013 06:35
Add Comments to Formulas and Cells in Excel 2013 Stefan Mileschin WebNews 0 9th May 2013 07:24
Stanford Uni evokes BIL gates to control your cells Stefan Mileschin WebNews 0 1st April 2013 08:52
Stem cells successfully made from endothelial cells in blood vessel lining Stefan Mileschin WebNews 0 3rd December 2012 11:06
Nanoscale computer chips set to invade your cells jmke WebNews 0 17th March 2010 16:45
Panasonic plans home-use storage battery cells jmke WebNews 0 24th December 2009 10:47
InkJet Printers Lying, Or Just Wrong? jmke WebNews 3 22nd June 2007 04:50
Guide to inkjet printers for photographers jmke WebNews 0 16th April 2007 08:30
LG Chem aims to be first to market in notebook fuel cells Sidney WebNews 0 29th September 2005 15:56
all in one laserjet vs inkjet Pirre General Madness - System Building Advice 4 15th July 2005 05:18

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:58.


Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO