It appears you have not yet registered with our community. To register please click here...

 
Go Back [M] > Madshrimps > WebNews
GIGABYTE DES and ASUS EPU Tested GIGABYTE DES and ASUS EPU Tested
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


GIGABYTE DES and ASUS EPU Tested
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 19th March 2008, 22:20   #1
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,771
jmke has disabled reputation
Default GIGABYTE DES and ASUS EPU Tested

With the big focus on the environment and how much of a negative impact the 21st century society is having on it, itís not surprising we are seeing things moving towards ďgreenĒ. When we refer to green, we arenít talking about the colour, we are taking about measures used to reduce the devastating impact we are having on the environment because of our industrialised society.

Computer companies are now starting to take the green initiative very seriously with new production methods to make them more environmentally sound. The first stages have already been implemented with the RoHS designs from GIGABYTE and ASUS, this is accomplished by moving from lead based solder to a totally lead free substitute, thus reducing the overall amount of lead required.

http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/13...ted/index.html
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th March 2008, 22:33   #2
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,771
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

Impressive differences between enabled/disabled modes. but the question is, if a system doesn't use all power phases even when under full load, why are they there? and could the cost not just be simply reduced by removing them completely? Or are the extra phases there to ensure future compatibility with more demanding CPUs?
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2008, 00:22   #3
Kougar
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
Impressive differences between enabled/disabled modes. but the question is, if a system doesn't use all power phases even when under full load, why are they there? and could the cost not just be simply reduced by removing them completely? Or are the extra phases there to ensure future compatibility with more demanding CPUs?
12 phases have always been overkill, mostly used for marketing. It's really a dual 6 phase motherboard. Besides marketing purposes, OCed 65nm quads can draw up to 200watts from my experience.

Quote:
For the DQ6 series of boards, while technically there are a total of 12 phases, GIGABYTE’s Dual Quad design uses the PWM in Parallel, meaning there are 2x six phases in total
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2008, 07:32   #4
wutske
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Probably just-in-case and a nice extra for overclockers .

Quote:
the extra phases really would only be beneficial for overclockers
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[NL] Deal of the day: Asus 15.6" Laptop, 2.1Ghz T4300, 4Gb Ram, 320Gb HDD, Win 7 32b jmke WebNews 0 18th December 2009 15:17
ASUS EPU 6 vs. MSI DrMOS vs. GIGABYTE DES Advanced jmke WebNews 0 9th September 2008 15:37
EPU vs. DES power war wages on in Taipei jmke WebNews 0 19th May 2008 11:39
Gigabyte EP35-DS4: DES in Action jmke WebNews 0 21st April 2008 11:20
ASUS P5E3 Premium WiFi X48 Motherboard jmke WebNews 0 30th March 2008 20:05
Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS4 DES Sidney WebNews 0 4th March 2008 16:26
Gigabyte GA-EX38-DS4 jmke WebNews 0 25th February 2008 14:00

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:08.


Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO