It appears you have not yet registered with our community. To register please click here...

 
Go Back [M] > Madshrimps > Articles & Howto's
Canon PowerShot SD1000/IXUS 70 Digital Camera Review Canon PowerShot SD1000/IXUS 70 Digital Camera Review
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Canon PowerShot SD1000/IXUS 70 Digital Camera Review
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 20th July 2007, 18:58   #1
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,611
jmke has disabled reputation
Default Canon PowerShot SD1000/IXUS 70 Digital Camera Review

The Canon PowerShot SD1000 digital ELPH is an ultra compact camera no bigger than the size of a pack of cigarette. In Europe and Asia it is known as Canon IXUS 70. Designed as a point and shoot camera, it contains some features suitable for some tuff tasks in its price range. Let's find out how this little guy performs.

http://www.madshrimps.be/gotoartik.php?articID=589
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th August 2007, 20:33   #2
[M] Reviewer
 
Sidney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15,739
Sidney Freshly Registered
Default

Although the SD1000 does not have RAW image capability, the bundle software includes RAW image process. This is good news because I believe Nikon charges for this software.

Canon Customer Service is quite responsive in using email. The review unit "dust inside the viewfinder" required me to send the unit to local repair facility. Rather than doing that, I simply returned it to Sam's Club where I purchased it and I walked out with a new replacement.

The Canon Rebel was also returned to the retailer for replacement when the flash did not work the first time. I wonder what others may experience with Canon quality control.
__________________
lazyman

Opteron 165 (2) @2.85 1.42 vcore AMD Stock HSF + Chill Vent II
Sidney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 09:40   #3
wutske
 
Posts: n/a
Default

no ISO test ? It's incredibly important to know, film grain or not. Sometimes you have to bump the ISO and it's nice to know whether this will return a useless image or a somewhat usefull image. Some camera's (escpecialy the smaller ones) even have a lot of noise (and noise reduction artifacts) at lower ISO settings.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 09:49   #4
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,611
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

Find ISO setting for me
http://www.madshrimps.be/?action=get...&articID=5 89
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 12:23   #5
wutske
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
press up ?
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 12:39   #6
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,611
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

lol didn't see

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PROD...00/SD1000A.HTM

Quote:
Though the SD1000 has an ISO of 1600, the noise levels were too high for my taste. I usually kept it set to ISO 800 or below.
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 13:47   #7
[M] Reviewer
 
Sidney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15,739
Sidney Freshly Registered
Default

I normally stay away from using any high ISO; no difference than film. Likely compensate by using tripod for longer exposure or fill in flash. Higher ISO means more grains or Noise.

Nikon D40 has ISO starting 200
__________________
lazyman

Opteron 165 (2) @2.85 1.42 vcore AMD Stock HSF + Chill Vent II
Sidney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 15:26   #8
wutske
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lazyman View Post
I normally stay away from using any high ISO; no difference than film. Likely compensate by using tripod for longer exposure or fill in flash. Higher ISO means more grains or Noise.

Nikon D40 has ISO starting 200
sometimes, a tripod or a long exposure isn't always possible or wanted. I usualy stay away from high ISO too, but sometimes you can't do anything but using high ISO. Luckily my camera supports RAW .

The D40 might start at ISO200, but it has a CCD that is a lot larger, so signal/noise ratio is compareable to a fixed-lens camera at ISO50.
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th August 2007, 15:58   #9
[M] Reviewer
 
Sidney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15,739
Sidney Freshly Registered
Default

Night vision camera
Most compact and ultra compact Digicams don't have RAW, you have to pay for it.
There is only slight improvement; it is a matter of physics despite image compression. We will get there closer. Otherwise, we don't need flash.

Better to have a fast lens if money is not the issue.
__________________
lazyman

Opteron 165 (2) @2.85 1.42 vcore AMD Stock HSF + Chill Vent II

Last edited by Sidney : 9th August 2007 at 16:03.
Sidney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th August 2007, 09:20   #10
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,611
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

IXUS 30 Macro shot, cropped, no resize ->
Attached Thumbnails
canon-powershot-sd1000-ixus-70-digital-camera-review-img_3072.jpg
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:24.


Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO