It appears you have not yet registered with our community. To register please click here...

 
Go Back [M] > Madshrimps > WebNews
Cooler Master Unleashes the COSMOS S Chassis (Updated: With Reviews) Cooler Master Unleashes the COSMOS S Chassis (Updated: With Reviews)
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Cooler Master Unleashes the COSMOS S Chassis (Updated: With Reviews)
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 22nd February 2008, 08:51   #1
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Icon17 Cooler Master Unleashes the COSMOS S Chassis (Updated: With Reviews)

Cooler Master Unleashes the COSMOS S Chassis

Leave the competition in the dust with the ultimate PC enclosure


Taipei, Taiwan – February 22, 2008 - Since its introduction, Cooler Master’s COSMOS PC Chassis has garnering numerous awards and accolades around the world. Today, the best just got better as Cooler Master unleashes the COSMOS S Chassis, featuring a new racing design, a touch-sensitive panel, and a gamut of user-friendly features, the COSMOS S is the evolution of the ultimate PC enclosure.

When laying eyes on the COSMOS S for the first time, one is immediately drawn in by its sleek contours and exhilarating styling. Inspired by the some of the world’s finest race cars, the COSMOS S exudes both speed and sophistication. From the meshed front and side panels to the brushed aluminum finish, the COSMOS S is pure lust, offering an enclosure fit for evolved sensibilities of the discriminating PC enthusiast.

Sleek Contours and Exhilarating Style

But like a race car, the COSMOS S doesn’t get by on mere looks alone. A look under the hood reveals a high-performance chassis designed for maximum thermal performance. The side panel comes with a massive 200mm, 150 CFM fan for maximum graphics card cooling, while meshed front and side panel design offers superior ventilation. An independent air intake has been designed for a bottom-mounted PSU for easy installation and improved heat management. The top of the COSMOS S has been specially designed as well to accommodate an optional 3-fan radiator for unparalleled thermal performance. For those looking to truly put the pedal to the metal, the COSMOS S also comes complete with rear retaining holes for the latest liquid cooling kits.

As Cooler Master’s flagship gaming chassis, the COSMOS S comes with other amenities that put it at the top of its class. The enclosure comes with tool-free design, including side panels and add-on cards. On the top of the COSMOS S is an elegant touch sensor that also features a hidden I/O panel with USB ports, audio jacks, and even an eSATA port. What’s more, the COSMOS S can be fitted with Cooler Master’s unique 4-in-3 device module that allows 4 hard disks to be installed with the space of 3 5.25” drive bays.

The COSMOS S from Cooler Master -- Take one for a test drive today.

About Cooler Master

Cooler Master was founded to provide the best thermal solutions to our customers worldwide. Since its establishment a decade ago, we continue to invest in product development in order to provide the leading-edge innovations to people and businesses. Cooler Master’s enclosure technology line-up includes heat sinks and fans, chassis, power supplies, function panels and accessories. Cooler Master has its headquarters in Taipei, Taiwan, with global branch offices located in Europe, America and APAC, so that we can offer to our customers the best service in time. For more information on Cooler Master, please visit www.coolermaster.com.
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 14:07   #2
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

The finish on the Cosmos S looks good, with a black/gunmetal color combination and a variety of textures from steel mesh to brushed aluminum to glossy plastic. I love the look of an aluminum case inside, rather than cheap, painted steel. Unfortunately there's no side window on the Cosmos to show that off. The abundant use of mesh on the front and side panel does allow light to shine through, although only one led fan is included. If you have a noisy chipset or CPU fan it's going to seem louder because of the mesh, but the included fans are all very quiet, even running at full speed. I had no heat related issues the entire time I was testing, and I do keep my computer running F@H 24/7 so that says a lot about how cool the case stays.
http://www.ocia.net/reviews/cosmoss/page1.shtml
The side panels of the Cooler Master Cosmos S are easy to remove and require no tools. To remove either side panel all you need to do is press an eject button on the back of the case.
The panels pop off the sides and are easy to remove. Inside the case the drive bays are tool less as well. The same locking rails are used in the Cooler Master Cosmos S that owners of the Cosmos are familiar with.
http://www.i4u.com/full-review-386.html
The Cooler Master Cosmos S is an attractive and sleek case that looks even better than the standard Cosmos, holding its own in the higher end of the market when it comes to look. If the Antec P182 is just a little too plain for your tastes then the Cosmos S is an acceptable compromise between that and a Cooler Master Stacker 830 Custom.

Looking at the Cosmos as a whole, it’s clear to see that the re-design has mainly focused on improving the look and accessibility of the chassis rather than making the fan cooling capabilities more powerful. That’s a mixed blessing obviously, but to us the benefits of this door-less and funkier design (that looks great in champagne grey) outweighs the unimproved fan cooling. It's also worth bearing in mind that the Cosmos S seems more aimed at watercoolers too – there’s room for a self contained radiator and so forth in the top.

Simply put, the Cosmos S isn’t the best case we’ve ever seen and there are other chassis’ out there that can outpunch it in most areas – but we like the overall aesthetic and, if you’re a watercooler, it could be seen as great value for money (especially compared to the Silverstone TJ-07). However, when you consider that the Cosmos S is 25 percent more than the original Cosmos and doesn’t improve cooling performance, you have to ask whether that extra cost is worth it. We love the thought that has gone into the case’s design and some will definitely see value in the improvements made—especially on the watercooling front—but it’s not for every man and his dog.
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/200...ter_cosmos_s/1
To get the system hot under the collar, both OCCT, ATITool (artifact scan) and HDTach (Long Bench) were run simultaneously for 30 minutes. As we can see from the graph above, the temperature inside the case rose by a total of 11c, which isn't too bad considering components such as the CPU and GPU were kicking out between 50-60°C of heat. In comparison, a recent test of Lian Li's V2000 chassis (under same conditions) saw a slightly larger increase of 15c. Good work Cooler Master.
http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews.p...osmos_s_case/1

Cooler Master really included many new features that I would expect to become a standard with high end computer cases, like the very cool touch sensor that replaced the standard power button. When building a high end computer system many user's focus on the internal components and not on the case, but with the Cosmos S arriving in March, the case should become a high priority.
http://www.bigbruin.com/2008/cosmos_1

In the world of computer cases, it seems that far too many do not stand out from the crowd. Cooler Master has decided to break tradition and create something special. With many features not seen before and full eATX compatibility, how well does the Cosmos S stand out?
http://techgage.com/article/cooler_master_cosmos_s/
__________________

Last edited by jmke : 26th February 2008 at 09:27.
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 14:14   #3
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

A big tower, who is made to cool your PC. Let's see how this one works.
http://www.cowcotland.com/articles/2...-cosmos-s.html
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 14:15   #4
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

The new Coolermaster Cosmos -S- is the next PC Case in the Technic3D Editorship. See you in the following Review which qualities the High-End Gaming Tower with a new Cooling concept (200mm Fan) and many Features presents. Better than the Cosmos 1000?

http://www.technic3d.com/article-636...se-im-test.htm
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 14:15   #5
Faiakes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Case?

You must have children in the house jmke.
I have long given up on the notion of a case. Not worth it. I use an HSPC Tech station and it keeps everything very neat indeed.
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 14:17   #6
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

maybe if you swap hardware a lot, not having a full case comes in handy.

but in all other cases (pun intended), I hardly recommend a case, not only for dust, but also for sturdiness, safety from accidental "flying objects" AND better cooling!
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 14:34   #7
Faiakes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
maybe if you swap hardware a lot, not having a full case comes in handy.

but in all other cases (pun intended), I hardly recommend a case, not only for dust, but also for sturdiness, safety from accidental "flying objects" AND better cooling!
OK, I feel I need to reply now:

1) Dust: I haven't noticed significantly more dust on my no-case setup compared to my older case setups. In any case, a can of compressed air and 30 seconds of your time, every 8 months or so, solves that easily.

2) "Flying Objects" ?!?
In 2 years of not using a case, not a single instance of "flying objects" (unless you're having rage issues or something )

3) Better cooling WITH a case ?!?
How is that so? This is buffling.

4) Sturdiness ?
Please explain. My setup is very "sturdy" as it is. What do you mean?


Plus,

5) Lesser power consumption
6) Less costs (bying/replacing fans, case)
7) Less noise (from all those extra fans and the increased ambient temp inside a case)

Last edited by Faiakes : 22nd February 2008 at 14:40.
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 15:00   #8
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faiakes View Post
OK, I feel I need to reply now:
Quote was are on!

Quote:
1) Dust: I haven't noticed significantly more dust on my no-case setup compared to my older case setups. In any case, a can of compressed air and 30 seconds of your time, every 8 months or so, solves that easily.
Outside a case dust will get stuck very quickly in the fins of every actively cooled heatsink in your system, if your motherboard is lying flat out in the open it will settle everywhere. Fan filters work excellently inside a case if you make sure no other entrees from air are possible but through the dust filter, after 1 week you can already notice the effect, no cathair, dust from carpet, etc inside your heatsinks, clogging up the airflow and increasing temps.

Quote:
2) "Flying Objects" ?!?
In 2 years of not using a case, not a single instance of "flying objects" (unless you're having rage issues or something )
nothing to do with rage, and open test setup in a live environment is an accident waiting to happen, a small paperclip or spring is enough to short-circuit the lot (ask Piotke), if you have shelves nearby, things might drop down, causing a broken fan blade (92mm papst fan with 3 instead of 4 blades is quite... noisy and trembles a lot!) ; all in all it's very dangerous compared to a box.

Quote:
3) Better cooling WITH a case ?!?
How is that so? This is buffling.
how is that so he asks funny man forced airflow will always win against open none directed airflow; http://www.madshrimps.be/?action=get...=59&articID=38
also the reason why INSIDE a case you can enjoy PASSIVE cooling for CPU/GFX with one low noise exhaust fan. Now install that system outside a case and your CPU/GFX will overheat within minutes. Inside a case the ideal airflow path FRONT >>> BACK is designed to cool down the components inside, northbridge, CPU, GFX... and don't forget HARD DRIVES, without active cooling (no airflow) these will be 50+°C.

Quote:
4) Sturdiness ?
Please explain. My setup is very "sturdy" as it is. What do you mean?
I can kick a case, if I kick a motherboard, chance of damage is higher. I've never kicked a case/PC on purpose, but bumping into one, or somebody else moving briskly can be the end of your PC, on an open testbed


Quote:
5) Lesser power consumption
6) Less costs (bying/replacing fans, case)
7) Less noise (from all those extra fans and the increased ambient temp inside a case)
5) how so? you mean without that 1x120mm fan which draws 2W? not a worthy reason to not install a case
6) HSPC Tech station costs as much/more than any decent case; null argument. replacing fans... in or outside case is the same.
7) wow. completely wrong here, sorry, a PC inside a case vs PC outside case... PC inside a case is quieter, of course, those side panels are not there to make the PC hotter, they are there to: guide airflow front>back AND reduce noise. With 1x120mm exhaust fan you can cool the whole inside of the PC with active airflow. You'll need more than 1 fan to cool all your components on an open testbed.
__________________
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 15:33   #9
Faiakes
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
Quote wars are on!
I corrected you there. See! My powers of Quote are awesome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
1) Outside a case dust will get stuck very quickly in the fins of every actively cooled heatsink in your system, if your motherboard is lying flat out in the open it will settle everywhere. Fan filters work excellently inside a case if you make sure no other entries from air are possible but through the dust filter, after 1 week you can already notice the effect, no cat hair, dust from carpet, etc inside your heatsinks, clogging up the airflow and increasing temps.
It must be your dusty house then, that is the fault (personal attack = ad hominem ). I can't notice anything dust-wise after a week.
My setup sits on my desk, I have no pets, I vacuum (fairly) often.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
2) nothing to do with rage, and open test setup in a live environment is an accident waiting to happen, a small paperclip or spring is enough to short-circuit the lot (ask Piotke), if you have shelves nearby, things might drop down, causing a broken fan blade (92mm papst fan with 3 instead of 4 blades is quite... noisy and trembles a lot!) ; all in all it's very dangerous compared to a box.
Absolutely nothing over my setup. Of course, it makes sense not to have an open setup under something else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
3) How is that so he asks. Funny man ! Forced airflow will always win against open none directed airflow; http://www.madshrimps.be/?action=get...=59&articID=38
also the reason why INSIDE a case you can enjoy PASSIVE cooling for CPU/GFX with one low noise exhaust fan. Now install that system outside a case and your CPU/GFX will overheat within minutes. Inside a case the ideal airflow path FRONT >>> BACK is designed to cool down the components inside, northbridge, CPU, GFX... and don't forget HARD DRIVES, without active cooling (no airflow) these will be 50+°C.
Oh I'm well aware of the benefits of wind-tunnels. My question to you is: how many cases do you know of that can, patently, achieve a wind-tunnel effect?
Most are simply a box, where you can attach fans and your components.
If there any that do approach a wind-tunnel effect, they cost so much that it's not worth it. You best be spending that money on a better graphics card.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
4) I can kick a case, if I kick a motherboard, chance of damage is higher. I've never kicked a case/PC on purpose, but bumping into one, or somebody else moving briskly can be the end of your PC, on an open testbed
I have never kicked or even bumped into my open case setup in 2 years. It seats at the corner of my large desk (with the wall right behind it, too).
I haven't even come close to bumping into it. Good design. That's all I'm going to say

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
5) how so? you mean without that 1x120mm fan which draws 2W? not a worthy reason to not install a case
You mean several 120mm fans, and now there are 140mm and even larger. Add stupid lights, and other gimmicky paraphernalia for all which you need extra cables running inside the PC, further preventing airflow (with the exception of the few expensive cases that have accounted for this).

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
6) HSPC Tech station costs as much/more than any decent case; null argument. replacing fans... in or outside case is the same.
You don't actually need an HSPC Tech station. I have one simply because it reduces the footprint of my setup. You can easily dedicate a few shelves for your setup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmke View Post
7) wow. completely wrong here, sorry, a PC inside a case vs PC outside case... PC inside a case is quieter, of course, those side panels are not there to make the PC hotter, they are there to: guide airflow front>back AND reduce noise. With 1x120mm exhaust fan you can cool the whole inside of the PC with active airflow. You'll need more than 1 fan to cool all your components on an open testbed.
But they do make the PC hotter.
Heat cannot escape a case as easily as it can in an no-case setup.
Thus you have component fans running faster and louder.

OK, that was a satisfying amount of typing, I must say.
  Reply With Quote
Old 22nd February 2008, 15:41   #10
Madshrimp
 
jmke's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: 7090/Belgium
Posts: 78,614
jmke has disabled reputation
Default

One Single 120mm one box, in-take hole at bottom of front case, exhaust near top of case. Airflows from bottom over HDDs, passes over GFX area, mounts to CPU area, is exhausted near the rear.

One single case fan at the rear, no active in-take, dustfilter at in-take. Closed sidepanel with no holes. This WILL work in practically all cases I've tested, no need for "wind tunnel" as I think you refer to an actual tunnel inside the case. It can help, but it's not needed.

house is clean, brand new here, not particularly dusty, but open setup does get dirtier quicker. The only moment I would consider an open testbed is for motherboard testing, to easily swap out components. That's it.

My testbed was also on a desk; all in all if you don't swap mobo's every week, a case is vastly superior for safety, noise, cooling and portability
__________________

Last edited by jmke : 22nd February 2008 at 15:43.
jmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cooler Master Introduces a Mid Tower Chassis – Gladiator 600 jmke WebNews 0 22nd April 2009 09:35
Cooler Master Black Label Limited Edition Cosmos Chassis jmke WebNews 0 15th January 2009 11:05
Cooler Master Cosmos Black Label Computer Case Preview jmke WebNews 0 12th December 2008 11:04
Cooler Master Presents a Silent Mid-tower Chassis – Sileo 500 jmke WebNews 0 26th November 2008 16:33
Cooler Master CSX Medusa Cosmos Chassis jmke WebNews 0 8th August 2008 14:21
Cooler Master COSMOS S Chassis jmke WebNews 0 1st April 2008 12:37
Cooler Master Cosmos S system chassis review Sidney WebNews 0 4th March 2008 15:17
Cooler Master Cosmos S jmke WebNews 1 29th February 2008 02:41
Cooler Master Announces ESA Chassis, PSU and Watering Cooling Sidney WebNews 1 13th November 2007 08:17
Cooler Master Cosmos 1000 EATX Case Review jmke WebNews 0 1st August 2007 15:51

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:51.


Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO