It appears you have not yet registered with our community. To register please click here...

 
Go Back [M] > For Sale - LAN Parties - Other > Off-Topic Hangout
Where art meets science Where art meets science
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Where art meets science
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 4th November 2005, 23:36   #11
FreeStyler
 
Posts: n/a
Default

no that would still be water vapour.

Maybe at plasma temperatures (WAY above 100C, more like WAY above 1000C) the atoms will probably seperate, and probably get into a super ionized state. But that's not going to happen under normal earth conditions.
Electrolisis (or whatever the correct english term for it might be) will cause the molecule to split. But that can happen even at room temp (it can't be solid that's all)

That is, if I recall chemistry lessons correctly.
 
Old 5th November 2005, 00:24   #12
[M] Reviewer
 
Sidney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15,739
Sidney Freshly Registered
Default

No Sir,
Try this - put a bucket of water and set it at 101c, the bucket of water turns into steam where the very small molecules will be attract to high oxygen in the air becoming oxygen and hydrogen gases. Water no more the 0 becomes 02 (in gas form) and H2 becomes gas with the single oxygen molecule.

Separation of many molecules do not require extreme high temp.

Oxidation or rust on metal requires only room temp

You don't need 1000C to separate water; hence boiling point.
__________________
lazyman

Opteron 165 (2) @2.85 1.42 vcore AMD Stock HSF + Chill Vent II
Sidney is offline  
Old 5th November 2005, 01:09   #13
FreeStyler
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The boiling of water is a mere physical reaction, the molecues are agitated enough to loose all cohesion and thus creating vapour. The molecules themselves still remain intact however, and they don't just split into their atoms.
Thank god for that, cause a H2-O2 mixture is quite the recipy for disaster. One of the more explosive mixtures on this planet. Especially since the boiling would have put it above 100C.

Basic chemistry:
2 H + O --> 2 HO
This is a reaction in which a lot of energy is created. Thus it moves completely to the HO stage. The only way you can move back is to add enough energy (and not just boiling it) for it to fall apart. this is how they create hydrogen for use in fuel cells or internal combustion engines. (hydrogen gas doesn't naturally occur in the lower regions of the atmosphere)

Yes there are cases where water molecules can be split up. But this is part of a larger chemical reaction, like oxidation. The energy required to slpit the water would be compensated by the rest of the reaction.

Anyway to explain this all you'll need several hours of lessons in which they explain entropy, reduction-oxidation, acid-base reactions... (
Been there, done that. And allthough I'll need my books for the details, I definitly know that just boiling water does not break down a water molecule into it's atomic blocks.
 
Old 5th November 2005, 01:27   #14
[M] Reviewer
 
Sidney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15,739
Sidney Freshly Registered
Default

http://www.ucc.ie/ucc/depts/chem/dol...m/elem001.html

I did not finish my degree in Chemistry because I failed in my second year ..... busy motorcycling around I did finish my degree in Business / Accounting on time

I love to learn how ever long it takes.
__________________
lazyman

Opteron 165 (2) @2.85 1.42 vcore AMD Stock HSF + Chill Vent II
Sidney is offline  
Old 5th November 2005, 11:03   #15
FreeStyler
 
Posts: n/a
Default

ah the memories...
 
Old 5th November 2005, 12:39   #16
Zwaplat
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by lazyman
No Sir,
Try this - put a bucket of water and set it at 101c, the bucket of water turns into steam where the very small molecules will be attract to high oxygen in the air becoming oxygen and hydrogen gases. Water no more the 0 becomes 02 (in gas form) and H2 becomes gas with the single oxygen molecule.

Separation of many molecules do not require extreme high temp.

Oxidation or rust on metal requires only room temp

You don't need 1000C to separate water; hence boiling point.
AHAHAHAHAH.
 
Old 5th November 2005, 16:06   #17
[M] Reviewer
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,202
BlackRabbit Freshly Registered
Default

And to confuse a little bit more: it IS possible to seperate water molecules at room temp
BlackRabbit is offline  
Old 5th November 2005, 21:10   #18
Zwaplat
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by BlackRabbit
And to confuse a little bit more: it IS possible to seperate water molecules at room temp
You mean, separating the water molecules from each other (good luck, you'll be busy for a while), or separating each molecule into it's atoms?
 
Old 6th November 2005, 01:43   #19
[M] Reviewer
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 1,202
BlackRabbit Freshly Registered
Default

The molecules themselves.
BlackRabbit is offline  
Old 6th November 2005, 12:51   #20
FreeStyler
 
Posts: n/a
Default

yea but not at room pressure.
 
Closed Thread


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[M] Art Technology E Ink Digital Hour Clock Watch Review jmke WebNews 1 25th July 2010 18:45
Art Technology E Ink Digital Hour Clock Watch Review jmke Articles & Howto's 0 25th July 2010 18:44
Official Windows 7 Box Art Spotted jmke WebNews 0 8th June 2009 13:13
Art Lebedev Announces Optimus Pultius Keypad jmke WebNews 0 23rd July 2008 17:09

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 16:14.


Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO